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Crankin' It Up

Why do I run lousy DOS tests? I have a theory; to date it's proven moderately useful and certainly saves hard drives from data corruption. The theory goes that if you crank the voltage up to 15% over spec (in this case 1.70 volts), shave off about 10% of the max speed obtained and then run at that speed with default voltage. When I tested the 366@550 I found that it maxed out at 616 MHz (112x5.5) at 2.2-2.3 volts. Shave off 10% (62 MHz) and you wind up with 554 MHz, which is close enough to 550 for me. It ran at 550 at 2.0 volts for 4 months before being retired. The P3 650 I tested in April did not appear to jibe with my theory though. The C1 and now the C2 series of chips do follow my theory. The numbers quoted for Vcore are the minimum, not the maximum required for stable operation.

DOS Tests (boot to a floppy and run cache check 7)

FSB (MHz)
Speed (MHz)
Vcore (Volts)
Chip Temp (F)
Case Temp (F)
66
533
1.50
78
75
100
800
1.50
84
80
110
880
1.50
86
82
112
896
1.55
87
82
115
920
1.60
89
82

Sailing past 800 without so much as a whimper, I briefly fantasized about reaching the magic 1 GHz mark. Then, default voltage refused to boot at anything higher than 880. Bummer. Still, 920 Mhz is a tremendous feat from silicon rated by Intel to be stable at 533 MHz. Notice that 1.60 volts was the minimum to pass the cache check tests. Increasing to the Abit's maximum of 1.70 volts produced no further gain in speed.

Windows 98SE Tests (stable with all 2D/3D applications)

FSB (MHz)
Speed (MHz)
Vcore (Volts)
Chip Temp (F)
Case Temp (F)
66
533
1.50
95
89
100
800
1.50
95
90
103
824
1.55
99
91
105
840
1.60
100
92
110
880
1.70
102
93

Nothing to be ashamed about here. Fully stable at 800 MHz at 1.50 volts, the 533 gains 266 MHz just from a FSB adjustment. I settled on 840 Mhz at 1.60 Volts. Note that I used no adapter whatsoever. Adapters, by any manufacturer, introduce some level of electrical noise just by the extra connections present. Stout power supplies are also required at these high speeds. Don't expect that your HP Pavilion box, etc., sporting a wimpy 150 Watt supply could even begin to handle the close to 16 Amp peak current draw from the +5V line for any length of time.





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